SSI News Blog

Australia is home to more than three million women from migrant backgrounds. In the upcoming Federal election on 18 May, we all have the opportunity to the shape our country’s future. But in order to do that, we have to participate. 

Two women on the couch looking at a tablet
The Harmony Votes website has pointers for researching candidates based on the issues that matter to you.

In addition to my role as SSI CEO, I’m also on the council of the Harmony Alliance. In the lead up to the election, this national representative body for migrant and refugee women has launched the Harmony Votes campaign. This campaign aims to encourage and equip migrant and refugee women to actively participate and exercise their democratic rights in the forthcoming election.

Key elements of this campaign include:

  • Resources about why it is important for people of migrant background, and particularly women, to vote
  • Information on Australia’s fair and independent election process, and our parliamentary system
  • A checklist so users can assess whether or not they are eligible and set-up to vote
  • Pointers for how to research and assess candidates based on the issues that matter to you 

You can check this all out on the Harmony Votes website.

As part of the Harmony Votes campaign, I am calling on all Australians, but particularly eligible women of migrant and refugee backgrounds, to exercise their right to participate in our democracy. It is important for all Australians to make their vote count ― to properly research how the parties view issues and make promises that affect us, our families and our communities. 

Some of our SSI colleagues have added their voices to this campaign. Click here to hear what issues they’ll be voting for on May 18.

Voting is not only our right, but our duty to shape a future that is inclusive of all Australians.

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