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Knox Grammar Old Boys find a level playing field with refugees and people seeking asylum

SSI soccer knockout

Soccer is proving to be a great unifier for refugees, people seeking refugee status and Australian communities.

Refugees and people claiming asylum who are supported by Settlement Services International (SSI) were joined by Knox Grammar School alumni on the weekend to take part in a soccer knock-out competition. 

SSI is a leading not-for-profit organisation providing a range of services in the areas of humanitarian settlement, accommodation, asylum seeker assistance and multicultural foster care in NSW.

About 40 people took part in the knock-out soccer competition at Lidcombe between teams of five, which was organised by SSI staff on Saturday, February 15.

Also taking part in the competition were about six members of the Knox Grammar Old Boys alumni.

SSI CEO Violet Roumeliotis said the former Knox Grammar students had asked her organisation how they could support new arrivals.

“It was very inspiring to see how proactive the boys from Knox Grammar School were in wanting to support people who have come to Australia from very difficult circumstances,” Ms Roumeliotis said.

“One of the school’s alumni, Marco van Westing, approached SSI and asked how he and his friends could help refugees, and those people applying for refugee status, make the transition to living in Australia.

“When staff at SSI proposed a soccer competition for our clients, the Knox Grammar Old Boys thought it was a great opportunity for them to get involved.

Read more: Knox Grammar Old Boys find a level playing field with refugees and people seeking asylum

Olympic judo coach helps teenage asylum seekers

Shaheen and Hussain.

Talented teenagers Shaheen and Hussain Moghadamshaidie could represent NSW in judo at the National Championships if they can raise the money to travel to qualifying competitions around the country.

The boys, aged 15 and 16, have already impressed state and national coaches after Settlement Services International (SSI) and their Castle Hill judo club supported their enthusiasm to participate in the Olympic sport. SSI is a leading not-for-profit organisation providing a range of services in the areas of humanitarian settlement, accommodation, asylum seeker assistance and foster care in NSW.

Hussain and his brother Shaheen have been living in the community along with their father, mother and baby brother, awaiting the outcome of an application for refugee status since July last year.

The family is supported by SSI and is currently living in North Parramatta on bridging visas.

SSI CEO Violet Roumeliotis said Shaheen and Hussain had immediately wanted to start judo training when they arrived in Australia but their family had no money to pay for registration or uniforms.

“Judo is one of the most popular sports in the boys’ country of birth, Iran, so they were eager to look for a judo club to train with in Australia,” Ms Roumeliotis said.

“Because they are on bridging visas, their parents are unable to work and had limited funds to pay for judo costs.

“Shaheen and Hussain were lucky enough to find the Budokan Judo Club in Castle Hill, which is run by former Olympic coach and organiser of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games judo competition Rob Katz.

“Mr Katz and his club have very generously sponsored the boys by paying their costs for the first 12 months of membership. This includes four judo uniforms partially sponsored by the club’s supplier Sensei’ Martial Arts.

“But, from the boy’s success in the sport, the family now needs about $700 to pay for travel and accommodation to events in order to qualify for the National Championships.”

Ali Moghadamshaidie, the boys’ father, said Mr Katz and the Budokan Judo Club had treated them like family.

“This club is not only for Judo,” he said, “this club, for me and my sons, my wife and baby son, is like a school or family.”

“We have no family here or friends, this club is very good for us.”

Read more: Olympic judo coach helps teenage asylum seekers

Soccer unites refugees but who will give them a game?

Essa KhanSoccer is often called the game that unites the world but a group of refugees and asylum seekers from around the globe have found financial obstacles in their attempt to unite as a team in Sydney.

Players in the team unofficially known as Auburn United FC have come to Australia from Afghanistan, Africa, Nepal, Turkey and Tajikistan to find asylum.

According to Settlement Services International (SSI) CEO Violet Roumeliotis, most of the team members are on bridging visas, which means they are unable to work. SSI provides case management and other support services to many of the refugee and asylum seeker members of the team. Other players are full-time overseas students.

“Living on a tight budget, these players have no funds to pay registration fees of between $200 and $300 each to join an organised competition,” Ms Roumeliotis said.

“Without support from a sponsor, they have no hope of playing the world game in Australia.”

Their options for engaging in Sydney’s cultural life are limited but they come together to play soccer, or football to most of the world, every week.

Until eight months ago, they formed only ad-hoc to play with whoever turned up to Auburn Park on any given night.

But when Afghan asylum seeker and soccer coach Essa Khan, 44, found them kicking a ball in the dark while out walking, he quickly rounded them up in to a team.

“It’s my passion and I like to give something to the young people,” Essa said with his Settlement Services International case manager Archana Ghale interpreting.

“It helps their health, they can engage in an activity and avoid anti-social behaviour.

“It’s better to play football than to get involved in alcohol or drugs.”

Read more: Soccer unites refugees but who will give them a game?

New foster care service helps children maintain cultural links

July 11, 2013

Minister for Family and Community Services Pru Goward, today launched the Multicultural Foster Care Service, a new provider of out-of-home care services specifically for children and young people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, managed by Settlement Services International (SSI).

Read more: New foster care service helps children maintain cultural links

Winter Warmers campaign - race against the weather

April 11, 2013                         

As the cooler weather settles in, many new arrivals to our city will be facing their first winter with few warm clothes and suitable shoes. Donations of clean, used clothing in good condition and blankets are being sought by Settlement Services International (SSI), a not-for-profit organisation and primary provider of services to asylum seekers, refugees and humanitarian entrants.

 

Read more: Winter Warmers campaign - race against the weather

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