Media Releases

Young people from all walks of life will take over the Auburn Centre for Community next Wednesday for the annual MY Kitchen Rocks event.

Now in its second year, Multicultural Youth (MY) Kitchen Rocks is an opportunity for young people from diverse backgrounds to make new friends and take part in activities including sports, candle making and music workshops.

The event, which is organised by Settlement Services International (SSI), Youth Collective and Auburn Diversity Services Inc, has attracted more than 250 participants, including a large contingent of newly arrived young people from refugee and asylum seeker backgrounds.

SSI Youth Projects Coordinator Dor Akech Achiek said, “MY Kitchen Rocks creates a relaxed, fun environment for newly arrived young people to meet their peers and make new community connections over food, music and sports. With the games, giveaways and activities, it’s a great chance for participants to unwind and just enjoy being young.”

Mr Achiek said all of the work SSI does with young refugees and people seeking asylum is designed to build their confidence, resilience and self-empowerment.

“The young people we work with have unique skills, ideas and experiences that can greatly benefit our country. They do, however, need extra support to overcome challenges their Australia-born peers do not face, such as language barriers and issues over identity and culture,” he said.

“Events such as MY Kitchen Rocks are a good way to help multicultural young people engage with their local community and make friends with other youth who have experienced similar situations to themselves.”

MY Kitchen Rocks will take place at Auburn Centre for Community from 11am to 2pm on Wednesday October 5 as part of SSI’s regular Community Kitchen event.

 

Media enquiries:

SSI Communications Assistant Hannah Gartrell 0488 680 287 or 02 8799 6740

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