SSI News Blog

Three years ago, the inaugural Cultural Shift symposium explored and shared the needs of recently arrived migrant and refugee families, and the most effective models and approaches for supporting these families through their settlement journey.



Next month, delegates from within the settlement sector, and beyond, will gather again to discuss how they are using more innovative and creative ways to enhance the support these families receive.

SSI CEO Violet Roumeliotis recalled there was a strong sense of optimism and enthusiasm among delegates for continued action to improve service responses for recently arrived families.

“Many of the lessons and recommendations from that day have informed our thinking and practices on how SSI can work more effectively and collaboratively to enhance settlement and support services for refugee and migrant families,” Ms Roumeliotis said.

Post-conference evaluation indicated an extremely high level of satisfaction across all aspects of the symposium, and feedback included “really good to see so many services from the sector coming together; would love to see this event continue into the future” and a suggested improvement was “make it a two-day symposium”.

In light of this, SSI is pleased to be hosting another Cultural Shift event, this time a two-day conference that extends the theme of settlement further, to also discuss the concept of ‘belonging’.

“I’m really looking forward to exploring with my colleagues in the sector how best to foster a sense of belonging that is so important to people’s health and wellbeing, and how we can create better settlement conditions and opportunities for families.

“I’m also curious to learn more about the wonderful work that is happening in the sector during the concurrent and plenary sessions. There are some fantastic speakers and presenters scheduled,” Ms Roumeliotis said.

For more information about the conference program and to register to attend, please visit the Cultural Shift website.

Success stories

Muhammad Sadiq: How I came to call Australia home

Muhammad Sadiq cooking for people seeking asylum at Community Kitchen.I came to Australia as a refugee in 2009, hoping to find a peaceful place to build a home for my family. Increasing persecution of the Hazara community from which my family and I come meant that our native land, Pakistan, was no longer the safe haven it once had been.

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